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Hajar el Hibla
the stone of the pregnant woman

Joseph O'Kelly, oud-maker
oud-maker 2
 

December 31 3:50 PM the Capricorn Sun sets on London Fields

Autumn Equinox in London Fields

Spring Ostara in London Fields

Cake fest in Hackney:

May Daunce Beltane, the return of the Sun

The Hackney MILE OF ART

Mile of Art Photoblog1 
 
/2
        /3

GrassyArtz in London Fields announcement

Passing Clouds party

Gabrielle Motola:  Exhibition of a community exhibiting itself.

July '06 GrassyArtz photoblog 1/
   /2

Mile OF ART 2  1st October 2006. www.hibla.com/mile06
www.mileofart.com    

 

 

 

May Daunce, Beltane, The return of the Sun

In the weave of the maypole the Sun is welcomed back. On the hills fires are lit. 

hibla/Maypole-Highgate 1hibla/Maypole-Highgate 2 

Hibla Maypole-Highgate Movie

 Some in the basements of pubs have their own spells to get into the pole. Pictured: 

Never had man more joyfull day then this,
Whom heaven would heape with blis,
Make feast therefore now all this live-long day;
This day for ever to me holy is.
Poure out the wine without restraint or stay,
Poure not by cups, but by the belly full,
Poure out to all that wull,
And sprinkle all the postes and wals with wine,
That they may sweat, and drunken be withall.
Crowne ye God Bacchus with a coronall,
And Hymen also crowne with wreathes of vine;
And let the Graces daunce unto the rest,
For they can doo it best:
The whiles the maydens doe theyr carroll sing,
To which the woods shall answer, and theyr eccho ring.

Ring ye the bels, ye yong men of the towne,
And leave your wonted labors for this day:
This day is holy; doe ye write it downe,
That ye for ever it remember may.
This day the sunne is in his chiefest hight,
With Barnaby the bright,
From whence declining daily by degrees,
He somewhat loseth of his heat and light,
When once the Crab behind his back he sees.
But for this time it ill ordained was,
To chose the longest day in all the yeare,
And shortest night, when longest fitter weare:
Yet never day so long, but late would passe.
Ring ye the bels, to make it weare away,
And bonefiers make all day;
And daunce about them, and about them sing,
That all the woods may answer, and your eccho ring.

Edmund Spenser Epithalamion

http://www.englishverse.com/poems/epithalamion 

 

 

 

  

All text and images and linked images are 1999-2007 Joseph O'Kelly..If you require any further information on permitted use, or a licence to republish any material, email  copyright@hibla.com